About the author:

Daniel H. Weberman, The Kabinet Founder – Terry I. Weberman, The Kabinet CPA

Daniel is an attorney and the founder of Kabinet. He is always here to help answer your home ownership questions as well as anything related to using your Kabinet app. Ask Daniel a question by sending an email to info@kabinet.com and put “Daniel” in the subject line. This is a complimentary service as part of Kabinet’s commitment to you! Terry is a Certified Public Accountant in the New York Metro area with experience working with businesses and individuals across all backgrounds. He writes articles for the Kabinet blog and is here to help you on your home ownership and/or investing journey. Ask Terry a question by sending an email to info@kabinet.com and put “Terry CPA” in the subject line. This is a complimentary service as part of Kabinet’s commitment to you!

Introduction

The eviction process in New York can be a difficult and confusing process for landlords and tenants. This blog post will outline the steps of the eviction process in New York and provide helpful tips to both landlords and tenants.

Steps for Landlords

Landlords in New York must follow a strict set of steps when evicting a tenant. The first step is to serve the tenant with a notice to quit. This is a written notice that outlines the reasons for the eviction and the amount of time the tenant has to remedy the situation or move out. After the tenant has been served with the notice to quit, the landlord must file a petition with the court. The court will then issue a summons to the tenant. The tenant must be served with the summons in order to proceed with the eviction.

Steps for Tenants

Tenants in New York have certain rights when it comes to the eviction process. After being served with a notice to quit, the tenant has the right to respond to the court. This is done by filing an answer with the court. The answer should include any defenses the tenant has to the eviction. The tenant also has the right to negotiate a settlement agreement with the landlord. This agreement may allow the tenant to stay in the rental property, but the landlord has the final say.

Eviction Hearings

If a settlement agreement cannot be reached, the case will move to an eviction hearing. During the hearing, both the landlord and the tenant will present evidence and testimony to the judge. The judge will then make a decision and issue an order to the tenant. The order will either require the tenant to move out of the rental property or allow the tenant to stay.

Conclusion

The eviction process in New York can be long and complicated. It is important for both landlords and tenants to understand their rights and responsibilities. With the right information, tenants and landlords can navigate the eviction process and reach a fair resolution.

Resources

If you are looking for more information on eviction in New York, here are some helpful resources:

Note

Daniel, The Kabinet Founder, has made every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information within this article was correct at time of publication. He does not assume and hereby disclaims any liability to any party for any loss, damage, or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from accident, negligence, or any other cause. Speak to your advisor to make sure you qualify for such benefits or opportunities. Do not rely solely on this abbreviated article, it is for informational purposes only. Terry, The Kabinet CPA, has made every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information within this article was correct at time of publication. He does not assume and hereby disclaims any liability to any party for any loss, damage, or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from accident, negligence, or any other cause. Speak to your advisor to make sure you qualify for such benefits or opportunities. Do not rely solely on this abbreviated article, it is for informational purposes only.